• Allow client opportunity to set own pace in working with problems.
  • Nursing interventions should center on the client as a person, not on control of the symptoms. Symptoms are important, but not as important as the person having them.
  • Recognize your own feelings toward clients and deal with them.
  • Go to the client who needs help the most.
  • Do not allow a situation to develop or continue in which a client becomes the focus of attention in a negative manner.
  • If client behavior is bizarre, base your decision to intervene on whether the client is endangering self or others.
  • Ask for help—do not try to be a hero when dealing with a client who is out of control!
  • Avoid highly competitive activities, that is, having one winner and a room full of losers.
  • Make frequent contact with clients—it lets them know they are worth your time and effort.
  • Remember to assess the physical needs of your client.
  • Have patience! Move at the client’s pace and ability.
  • Suggesting, requesting, or asking works better than commanding.
  • Therapeutic thinking is not thinking about or for, but with the client.
  • Be honest so the client can rely on you.
  • Make reality interesting enough that the client prefers it to his or her fantasy.
  • Compliment, reassure, and model appropriate behavior
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